Detection of a Transmitting Medium in Vacuo

The tenuous nature of the matter field or gravitational field medium restricts its direct confirmation and thus requires experimental methods that are capable of isolating evidence of a medium for electromagnetic energy transmission in vacuo. In designing such experiments, one must be keenly aware of the postulates of the Special and General Theories of Relativity so as to avoid ambiguity in the resulting data. Thus, measurements conducted aboard a moving optical apparatus are preferred to external measurements since the on-board results are not subject to the relativistic interpretation afforded measurements conducted from external reference frames. Similarly, experiments involving high speed particles or radiation from such particles may yield ambiguous results since extended particle decay rates are subject to explanation by both the Special Theory of Relativity and field medium theory. The latter theory attributes the observation of extended particle decay rates to the structural change induced by the application of high energy to the particle or to the effect of high speed particle transmission through the field medium. This effect is an important consideration in the design of experiments involving chemical or physical processes since the rates of change in such processes are predicted to be altered at high apparatus speeds relative to the earth or surrounding mass structure.

Additional difficulties can be anticipated on account of the necessity of apparatus movement in the proposed experimental methods. Previously conducted optical experiments such as those of Michelson and Morley, Kennedy and Thorndike, and Jaseja and Townes [8] have relied upon the earth as a moving platform in space and have been painstakingly designed for apparatus stability to insure the accuracy of fringe shift or beat frequency observations. Field medium theory does not treat the earth as a moving platform thus requiring apparatus designs to withstand rapid acceleration and sustained high velocities relative to the earth or other field generating mass. In laser-based experiments, additional difficulties are presented by extraneous magnetic effects produced by movement of the apparatus through the earth's or other massive object's magnetic field.

Suggested areas of investigation of the matter field or gravitational field medium are:
(1) The effect of source and receiver motion relative to the earth upon the transit time of electromagnetic energy.
(2) Observations of possible refraction or dispersion of electromagnetic energy near massive bodies.
(3) Variations in diffraction patterns or micro-diameter laser beam impact patterns produced by apparatus rotation aboard an earth-orbiting or high altitude platform.
(4) Measurements of the properties of high speed atomic particles by instruments moving in the direction of particle motion.
(5) Comparison of the speed of light in the direction of the earth’s rotation and in the direction opposite to the earth’s rotation.
Suggested methods for the detection of the matter field or gravitational field medium are:

(1) Earth-stationed experiments utilizing comparative on–board readings taken while an optical apparatus is alternately stationary and in motion relative to the earth, or is alternately aligned parallel and perpendicular relative to the direction of platform motion, should reveal changes in fringe shift patterns or beat frequencies caused by movement through the field medium.
Other methods, including experimental designs utilizing the Mossbauer Effect [10] aboard a moving platform are also feasible. It is extremely important that all experiments are designed such that the light is transmitted along evacuated optical paths to reduce any extinguishing effects of an air or gas medium
(2) Astronomical observations of suspected gravitational lenses provide opportunities to investigate possible refractive effects by the matter or gravitational field medium near massive objects. Although refraction near spherical masses may not be discernible from the effects predicted by current gravitational theory, the angular orientation of light deflection near asymmetrical masses may be significant in isolating evidence of refraction by a field medium. In addition, dispersion of the refracted light may occur under restrictive conditions and may be detectable by current techniques.
(3) Intervening object or aperture diffraction techniques or micro-diameter laser beam impact patterns utilizing an optical apparatus moving at high speed relative to the earth may provide evidence of the terrestrial field medium. Comparison of diffraction or impact patterns produced with the apparatus alternately aligned parallel and perpendicular to platform motion would be compared. Although the analysis of diffraction or impact patterns could provide unequivocal evidence of a field medium, the limited platform velocities attainable at or near the surface of the earth may hinder the implementation of such techniques. Furthermore, in analyzing diffraction data, the effect of high-speed motion through the field medium upon source frequency must be considered.

DIAGRAM 12

Apparatus designs such as the one depicted here may be capable of detecting high- speed motion through a field medium. A short wavelength laser pulse is reflected numerous times by internal mirrors, is reduced in diameter by reduction lenses, and is recorded on a photographic plate. The apparatus is then rotated 90 degrees and the procedure is repeated on the same photographic plate. Microscopic examination of the plate should reveal evidence of a predictable shift in beam impact points.


(4) Atomic particle experiments are suggested with some hesitancy since the necessary apparatus speeds relative to the earth or other field producing mass appear prohibitive. However, the principles of the experiments would rely upon the observed disparities in atomic particle behavior at rest and at speeds approaching that of the measured speed of light in vacuo.1
(5) Comparisons of the speed of light in the direction of the earth’s rotation and in the direction opposite such rotation should reveal a slower transmission speed in the direction of rotation.

1Note: An example of the divergence of particle characteristics at high speeds is given by W. Bertozzi [11] in which the addition of energy to high speed electrons in a linear accelerator did not result in a proportionate increase in electron velocity. Consistent with this example and consistent with the postulates of the Special Theory of Relativity, if an electron is accelerated by an earth-stationed experiment to a speed approaching that of light in vacuo, a second experimenter traveling in the same direction and at the same speed as the high speed electron, would observe the particle to be at rest. Consequently, in order for this second experimenter to accelerate the particle to a speed approaching that of light relative to his reference frame, he must impart the identical amount of energy to the particle that was previously imparted by the earth-stationed experimenter. The second experimenter will thus determine that the addition of energy to the rest particle results in a concomitant increase in velocity of the particle until the particle again approaches the speed of light in vacuo. According to field medium theory, however, the disproportionate energy to acceleration relation near the speed of light in vacuo results from the transmission of the particle through the matter or gravitational field medium at a speed approaching that of light in such medium. Thus, according to such theory, the second experimenter would immediately find that the addition of energy to the rest particle did not result in an equivalent increase in particle velocity.

Return

Copyright © 2003 GaoJianMing (S) Pte Ltd. All rights reserved.
Designed by GaoJianMing