Stellar and Terrestrial Light Transmission  

The rejection of a conducting medium for electromagnetic energy transmission in vacuo and the resultant acceptance of the postulates of the Special Theory of Relativity are, for the most part, attributable to the irreconcilability of the null results of the optical experiments designed to detect the earth’s motion in space and the concurrent observation of stellar aberration. With the introduction of an interacting field structure, however, the wholesale rejection of a conducting medium for light transmission in vacuo is unwarranted. 1;

Two proposed mechanisms for stellar light transmission are examined here, followed by their applications to the phenomenon of stellar aberration. Thereafter, a mechanism for terrestrial light transmission is examined, followed by several alternative solutions to the apparent disparity between the terrestrial optical experiments and the observation of stellar aberration. 

Mechanisms for Stellar Light Transmission

Alternative 1: Stellar light, prior to reaching the effective solar field, is transmitted primarily by the galactic field structure. Upon sufficient and continued penetration of the solar field, the stellar light is increasingly transmitted by such field. During the brief transmission time within the terrestrial field, the stellar light does not significantly transition to such field before reaching the earth-stationed observer (See Diagrams 4 and 5).

DIAGRAM 4

  Figure A demonstrates a light ray entering a hypothetical non-conducting “medium” that is moving to the right of the page.  Figure B represents the path of the ray over time.  Note that the ray is unaffected by the medium since no adherence of the ray to the medium occurs during transit.  Thus, the entry path and orientation of the ray are identical to the exit path and orientation of the ray.  This example is applicable to incoming stellar light that reached the earth without substantially transitioning to the terrestrial field during transit within such field (See Diagram 5).

DIAGRAM 5

Figure A demonstrates a stellar light ray, primarily transmitted by the solar field, impinging upon the effective terrestrial field threshold that is moving to the right of the page.  Figure B indicates the path of the ray over time (dashed line).  On account of the short transmission time of the ray within the effective terrestrial field, the field is essentially non-conducting (See Diagram 4).  Thus, the ray drifts in the earth-stationed observer’s telescope and the phenomenon of stellar aberration is observed (See Diagram 8).

Alternative 2: Stellar light transitions from the galactic field to the solar field prior to reaching the terrestrial field threshold.  Upon entering the effective terrestrial field, the stellar light undergoes a graduated transition from the solar field to the earth’s field such that the initial path of entry (the “drift” path) is translated into the final path of transmission through the local field medium (See Diagrams 6 and 7).

DIAGRAM 6

Figure A represents a light ray entering a conducting medium that is moving to the right of the page. Figure B and C show two possible paths and orientations of the ray through the medium over time (dashed lines). Both Figures B and C are based upon a graduated adherence of the ray to the medium such that the ray initially drifts within the medium with maximum adherence occurring just before exit. Note that the exit angle and orientation of the ray in Figure B are the same as those of entry whereas the exit angle and orientation of the ray in Figure C have been altered (See Diagram 7).

DIAGRAM 7

Figure A represents a stellar light ray that is transmitted primarily by the solar field before reaching the effective terrestrial field. The earth and terrestrial field are moving to the right of the page. Figure B represents the path of the ray through the terrestrial field over time (dashed line). In accordance with Diagram 6, Figure C, both the path and the orientation of the stellar ray are altered during transit within the field (medium) such that the ray arrives at the surface of the earth as shown in Figure C above. Thus, the ray enters the earth-stationed observer's telescope along an oblique transmission path and the phenomenon of stellar aberration is observed (See Diagram 9).

Stellar Aberration

Consistent with Alternative 1 as set out immediately above, the earth moves through the stellar light transmission structure (solar field) and thus through the incoming stellar light such that the earth-stationed observer's telescope must be oriented to compensate for the drifting of the stellar light during its transit time within the telescopic tube (See Diagram 8).

DIAGRAM 8

Figure A demonstrates an incoming stellar ray that has entered a vertically oriented telescope that is moving with the earth to the right of the page. The orientation of the ray is shown in Figure C. On account of the short transmission time within the effective terrestrial field, the ray does not significantly transition to such field and thus drifts in the telescopic tube (dashed line). Figure B shows the proper orientation of the telescope to center the ray in the eyepiece.

Consistent with Alternative 2, the stellar light is increasingly dragged by the earth’s field as the field is penetrated such that the stellar light is primarily transmitted by the terrestrial field prior to reaching the earth-stationed observer.  During such transition, the path of entry (“drift path”) of the stellar light within the effective terrestrial field threshold is translated into the final transmission path.  Thus, rather than drifting in the telescopic tube, the stellar light enters the telescope at a fixed angle commensurate with the earth’s orbital velocity (See Diagram 9).

DIAGRAM 9

Figure A demonstrates an incoming stellar ray that has entered a vertically oriented telescope that is moving with the earth to the right of the page. The orientation of the ray is shown in Figure C. Unlike Diagram 8 in which the ray drifts in the telescopic tube, the ray in this diagram is transmitted by the terrestrial field and enters the telescope along a fixed path (dashed line) commensurate with the orbital velocity of the earth. Figure B shows the proper orientation of the telescope to center the ray in the eyepiece.

Discussion

In considering the foregoing alternatives, one should be cautious in attributing the general characteristics of a material medium to the transmitting field structure. This caution is especially appropriate in view of the heretofore uninvestigated nature of interacting fields as transmitting media for electromagnetic energy. Thus, consistent with Alternative 1 as set out immediately above, if some alteration of the plane stellar waveform is required in the transition of the stellar light from one field medium to a locally more intense field medium, the brief transmission time within the effective terrestrial field may be insufficient to effect such change.2 In accordance with this approach, the stellar light is primarily transmitted to the earth-stationed observer by the solar field through which the orbiting earth moves.

 Alternative 2 is based upon the effect of the transition of stellar light from the solar field to the increasingly intense field “layers” of the terrestrial field medium. Consistent with this alternative, stellar light impinging perpendicularly upon the terrestrial field threshold is increasingly dragged by the terrestrial field as the field is penetrated and the stellar light is ultimately conducted at an oblique angle by the more intense field structure near the earth's surface.

 Light emitted at or near the earth's surface, however, having been generated within the effective terrestrial field, is significantly transmitted by such field upon emission. The terrestrial field thus constitutes a significant if not primary transmitting medium for light generated at or near the surface of the earth (See Diagrams 10 and 11).

DIAGRAM 10

Figure A represents two light rays in a transmitting medium that is moving rapidly to the right of the page. One ray has been generated within the medium by spontaneous emission whereas the other ray has been generated outside of the medium. Figure B represents the paths of the two rays over time (dashed lines). Note that the internally generated ray is fully dragged with the medium, indicating full adherence of the ray to the medium upon emission, whereas the externally generated ray initially drifts within the medium, indicating a graduated adherence of the ray to the medium (See Diagram 11).

DIAGRAM 11

 

This diagram applies the principles set out in Diagram 10 to both stellar and terrestrial light. Figure A demonstrates a stellar light ray entering the moving terrestrial field and a light ray generated at the surface of the earth. Figure B represents the paths of these rays over time (dashed lines). The path of the ray generated at the surface of the earth indicates a maximum adherence of the ray to such field upon emission whereas the path of the incoming stellar ray indicates a "drifting" or, in the alternative, an oblique transmission path, through the terrestrial field. This difference in light ray behavior within the terrestrial field provides a logical resolution of the optical experiments designed to detect the orbital motion of the earth and the observation of stellar aberration.

Methods of Resolution.

The preceding mechanisms provide several alternative solutions to the difficulties encountered in reconciling the null results of the optical experiments and the observation of stellar aberration. Thus, if incoming stellar light, having been primarily transmitted by the solar field, reaches the earth-stationed observer without significantly transitioning to the earth's field, stellar aberration is preserved. Alternatively, if the incoming stellar light does transition to the earth's field while maintaining the angle of entry relative to the threshold of the "moving" terrestrial field, stellar aberration is again preserved. Radiation utilized in the terrestrial or atmospheric optical experiments, however, having been generated within the effective terrestrial field, adheres to such field structure upon emission.3 Thus an attenuation or "masking" of the anticipated experimental data occurs since the radiation is transmitted by a field structure referenced to a relatively stationary earth.

1Note: “Electromagnetic energy” and “light” are treated as interchangeable terms throughout this text.
2 Note: Although two fields may have the same field intensity at a particular point in space, the two fields are not necessarily identical at such points since the field intensity for each field falls off at a specific rate that is dependent upon the emitting mass or emitting mass structure. Thus, the transition of light between fields may require the adaptation of the light wave to an additional field component.

3 Note: The results of optical experiments utilizing extra-terrestrial light may be compromised by reflection or transmission by an intervening substance within the effective terrestrial field.

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